Featuring work by Bethany Collins


Image courtesy of the Kentucky Museum of Arts and Craft. Photo credit: Ted Wathen.

Victory Over the Sun: The Poetics and Politics of Eclipse
August 19 - December 3, 2017
Kentucky Museum of Arts and Craft
715 West Main Street
Louisville, KY 40202

Victory Over the Sun takes into account the cosmic phenomenon and a host of other meanings that are held within the word eclipse. Artists who engage in acts of silencing, covering or masking, as well as conceptual gestures related to eclipsed narratives in American art and culture, will examine themes of blindness, censorship, obscurity, and suppression.

BETHANY COLLINS (b. 1984 Montgomery, AL) lives and works in Chicago, IL. Collins received an MFA from Georgia State University in Atlanta Georgia, a BFA from the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, AL and attended the Glasgow School of Art, Capstone International in Glasgow, Scotland. Recent solo exhibitions include Another Country, Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum, Michigan State University, MI;Gray Matters: Art en grisaille, Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, Ohio; Eye of the Beholder, Tarble Arts Center, Charleston IL;Beyond Boundaries, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia; Excerpt, Studio Museum in Harlem, New York NY; In Evidence, Van Every/ Smith Galleries, Davidson College, Davidson, North Carolina; The problem we all live with, Birmingham Museum of Art, Birmingham, AL; with the exception of the sky, Hudgens Center for the Arts, Duluth, Georgia, and Inquiry’s End, Richard Gray Gallery, Chicago, IL. Her work is included in the public collections of the Birmingham Museum of Art, Birmingham, AL; High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA; Montgomery Museum of Arts, Montgomery, AL; The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, NY; Zuckerman Museum of Art at the Kennesaw Stats University, Kennesaw, GA; Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Montgomery, AL; and the Agnes Scott College, Decatur, GA.

Image courtesy of the Kentucky Museum of Arts and Craft. Photo credit: Ted Wathen.

Image courtesy of the Kentucky Museum of Arts and Craft. Photo credit: Ted Wathen.